Tuesday, June 4, 2013

DOWNTOWN ROADS BLOCKED FOR CMA FESTIVAL
Broadway from First to Second Avenues, First Avenue from Demonbreun to Church Street, and Fifth Avenue from Korean Veterans Boulevard to Broadway all closed for the week on Monday.
The closures mean some added congestion for those who work and live downtown. Shelly Grona has worked downtown for six years. She says the annual festival is something you have to plan for.
"It makes it hard to get downtown and there's nowhere to park," said Grona. "There's people everywhere. So it's kind of crazy." Don Sexton said it makes his job difficult.
The road closures mean an increase in already slow traffic, but not everybody minds.
"It's wonderful. And the nice thing is even though we might get slwoed down a little with traffic, we all get to go and be a part of the festivities," said Mike Jenkins
Most say the crowds and traffic are just a part of downtown Nashville and they get used it.

READ MORE ABOUT THE CMA MUSIC FESTIVAL AND EVENTS, JUN 5TH-8TH

FLOODING IN MISSOURI FORCES EVACUATIONS
We've been there: water filling the streets, and coming up to the eaves of houses. Right now people in Missouri are dealing with it. A levee breach and major flooding in West Alton, Missouri have forced at least 300 people out of their homes. 

POWER HOUSE FIRE
Southern California's Powerhouse wildfire was 60 percent contained, as of this morning, though it's already burned at least 32 thousand acres in the past several days.

IRS REPORT OUT, LOOKS BAD FOR AGENCY
A new inspector general report on the IRS is being released today, and it's not looking good for the agency. A draft of the report shows 50-MILLION dollars spent on conferences over two years -- 2010 to 2012. FIFTY MILLION dollars. In a separate issue, representatives of some of the conservative groups targeted by the IRS for extra scrutiny will testify in a House hearing today.

PRESCRIPTION DRUG RING BUST
More than 20 Wilson County residents are under indictment by a federal grand jury for running a prescription drug ring. Before you consider selling your Oxycodone as they were allegedly doing, keep in mind each of these people could get 20 years in prison and a million dollar fine if they're convicted. 

INSTAGRAMMING FOOD PHOTOS CAN INDICATE A PROBLEM IN YOUR LIFE
Instagramming your meals may indicate a problem in the works. Basically, we post photos of things we care about. And if center-stage is food, food, food, it says you're possibly overweight, and may have an unhealthy focus on eating. What’s more, it affects your friends who see it, too. Food porn photos make everyone who sees them, likely to eat more. And we don't just eat more of the delicious-looking food in the photos, our appetites are increased for more of anything and everything.

TRICERATOPS SKELETON FOUND
Scientists are digging out one of the most complete skeletons ever found of a Triceratops, the three-horned, plant-eating dinosaur that lived about 65 million years ago. They've found the remains of three of the giant reptiles on a ranch in Wyoming.

JOBS: THE INDUSTRY WHERE THEY CAN'T GET ENOUGH WORKERS
For new graduates looking for a job, there's one industry that can't GET enough workers: homebuilding. Now that new home sales are going up, builders can't find enough construction workers to keep up with demand. The National Association of Home Builders says its members are behind on finishing houses, have turned down jobs and have lost sales because of it. 

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT BEFORE POSTING YOUR KIDS’ PHOTOS ONLINE
Here's something to think about before posting your kids' photo online: the creeps that can see it, and do something weird with it. The mother of a 5-year-old boy from Columbia says someone copied her son's photo from her blog, and created a fake blog with a fake name, and made up a whole story about the kid, saying he was sick with cancer, and then that he had died. The Columbia mom says her son is fine, and she's not sure what the fake blogger was trying to accomplish, but she's turned the information over to the authorities. 
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SUPREME COURT OKAYS DNA COLLECTIONS FROM ARRESTED PERSONS
The U.S. Supreme Court says police have the right to collect DNA from anyone they arrest... whether they're convicted of anything or not. Tennessee had already been doing cheek swabs for people arrested for violent crimes... and sending the info to a national database.

Speaking of: Violent crime is going up in the U.S. for the first time since 2006. Mostly in larger cities, about the size of Nashville.

STREET EROTICA BOOKS ON DISPLAY AT NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY
At the Nashville Public Library's Antioch branch, there's a display of books called 'Street erotica'... titles like "Still Dirty," "Girls From Da Hood" and "A Gangster's Girl?" Some people are upset over it, but the Library says it's just serving its customers in that neighborhood, and that those books are checked out four times as often as the rest of the books in the library.

CHECK FOR SEX OFFENDERS BEFORE YOU BOOK YOUR CHEAP VACATION HOTEL
Imagine checking in to a hotel, and finding out you're sharing it with sex offenders. That's possible. Kyle Evans with the Murfreesboro Police Department says because sex offenders have strict rules where they can live, they tend to congregate at hotels like the Regal Inn near the interstate in Murfreesboro. More than 16 live there.
    And it can be like that in other states, where you’re planning to book your cheap vacation hotel room, so Evans encourages travelers — especially if you’re traveling with kids — to check the state sex offender registry list before you decide where to stay.

SCHOOL BOARD MEETING MONDAY (LAST NIGHT) NIGHT OVER TEACHER RESIGNATIONS
We should hear something this week after the parents' group Save Our Schools has been rallying to get something done about Cheatham county's high teacher loss rate. 25% of teachers have resigned system-wide, many in the past month, and at Cheatham County High School, half the teaching positions are vacant. The parents claim the teachers who've resigned are afraid to speak up about school problems, because of being threatened with termination, demotions and shuffling them around.

DEACON JONES DIES
David “Deacon” Jones, who is credited with coining the term “sacking the quarterback” during his time as one of the greatest defensive ends in the NFL, has passed away. Rams fans nicknamed him “Secretary of Defense.” And in 1999, Sports Illustrated named him the “Defensive End of the Century.”  Deacon Jones was 74.

TACO BELL ACTS QUICKLY TO CONTROVERSY
So, some smart aleck in California posted a photo of himself on his Facebook Page, licking a stack of taco shells at work. And Taco Bell moved fast to put that story to bed. They say they believe none of the licked shells made it to customers, and that it's a prank, but they've contacted the store where Mr. Jj O'Brien Nolan works, or worked, and say they have ZERO tolerance for such nonsense.

KREE HARRISON IN TOWN
Kree Harrison from American Idol is in town today... she and Keith Urban are on the Opry tonight.

POOR PEOPLE WITHOUT HEALTH CARE
A Rand Study finds more than a dozen GOP-led states that are refusing to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act -- including Tennessee -- will leave millions of low-income adults uninsured. The study says three-point-six-million people living below the federal poverty line won't get have access to Medicaid coverage in those 14 states. 
 
VANDY BASEBALL
Congratulations to Vandy's baseball team. They beat Georgia Tech 7 to 1, and will next Louisville in the super regionals.

RICIN MAN INDICTED
The man accused of sending poison-laced letters to President Obama and other elected officials has been indicted on federal charges. James Everett Dutschke [[ DUT-skee ]] ].  The Oxford, Mississippi man could face life in prison if he's convicted. 

ZYNGA, MAKER OF FARMVILLE, CUTS WORKFORCE
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If you play games online, chances are that you play them on your phone or tablet. Now Zynga, the maker of online games like "Farmville," says it's cutting 18 percent of its workforce, to use that cash to get up to speed as its customers go from computers to mobile devices. The San Francisco-based company behind "Words With Friends" says it's harder to generate revenue on mobile devices.